• Working with Teens - Creating Engaging Mindfulness Experiences for Adolescents

    What’s happening with our students’ brain and how can mindfulness support them? 

    As a high school teacher in the Bronx for 14 years I got to meet and deeply know a lot of teens. Having those relationships taught me a lot about what makes adolescents tick. I saw that the way adults view teens impacts the way teens see themselves, and ultimately the lives they think they are capable of leading. I also witnessed how school settings can be fertile ground for greater understanding and connection, or misunderstanding and miscommunication between teachers and young adults.   

    One of the high schools I worked at was a traditional school, with honors classes, Advanced Placement courses, Senior trips and proms. The other was a transfer school, where students go as a last chance for a high school degree (their prior schools failing to meet these students' needs in one way or another). In this school students call teachers by their first name, they work closely with community based organizations, and it’s where I was lucky enough to introduce mindfulness. You can learn more about that school and my experience introducing mindfulness in this Atlantic article.

    Both schools were Title 1 schools, which meant the majority of the students were receiving free or reduced lunch. Both had committed, caring (and overworked) administrators, staff and teachers.  

    Since leaving the classroom I’ve gotten the opportunity to work with teens in more affluent communities (one of the schools a mere 10 miles north of the transfer school) where kids are getting the best education and resources their parents and communities can generously give. I wasn’t surprised to also see committed, caring, and overworked administrators, staff, and teachers but I was surprised to see how much these teens were also struggling. 

    Even though these adolescents’ educational contexts are very different, a couple of things are true for all of them. The adolescent years are challenging, confusing, and filled with changes to the body, their brain, and relationships. Adolescence is a tumultuous time of our lives!  

    Let’s also not forget about technology and the impact it’s having on our children. Most of us can probably remember what it was like to be bored when we were young and not have a screen readily available. Our parents would tell us to figure it out, go outside, go play. Or they would assign us a chore to make sure we didn’t stay bored. These moments of boredom often led to free play, which is critical in child development.  According to the American Academy of  Pediatrics free play helps children develop their imagination, curiosity, and healthy relationships with the children around them and their parents.


    Whether we think the advent of technology is good or bad, it is here to stay and it is rewiring our children’s minds. Many have a harder time focusing their attention and developing relationships outside of their digital persona. 

    The Developing Brains of Adolescents

    When I taught mindfulness to my teens in the Bronx, I often introduced the book Brainstorm by Dr. Daniel Siegel. Even though it was a challenging text for them to get through, they were engaged with the book because it was giving them insight into the way adults looked at them.  It helped them understand what was changing in their brains and effecting the way they were feeling and acting. I will summarize some of the things I shared with my students here, but if this is a topic, you think would be helpful to you or your students will find interesting, make sure to add Brainstorm to your reading list. 

    Myths of Adolescence:

    The way we see adolescents becomes the way they see themselves. These misunderstandings can lead to confusion and conflict for teens and adults.  Which of these myths are you familiar with?

    1. Raging hormones cause teenagers to “go mad” or “lose their minds.”According to Siegel hormones do increase, but these levels then stay consistent throughout much of adulthood. Its not the hormones that are causing behavior changes. What adolescents experience is primarily the result of natural and needed changes in their developing brains.

    2. Teens are immature and need to grow up.
    The risk-taking tendencies, impulsiveness, and high emotional sensitivity of teens is not a sign of immaturity but rather an outcome of exactly what they are supposed to be doing during this developmental stage—testing boundaries, creating their own view of the world, and preparing for life beyond the family home and school community.

    3. Growing up requires moving from dependence on adults to total independence from them.
    The healthy move to adulthood is toward interdependence, not complete do-it-yourself isolation. Giving care and receiving help from others is the model we should be supporting.

    Pause, take a couple of breaths, and reflect on your own middle or high school experience. I’m sure you can understand why adolescents struggle during this time of their lives especially if the adults around them fundamentally misunderstand them. Remembering our own experience can help us be more understanding and compassionate in the interactions we have with teens.


    Qualities of the Adolescent Mind:

    Dr. Siegel goes on to name the attributes of the adolescent mind as well as the benefits and challenges associated with these changes.  His book also guides reader through activities that ask adolescents to reflect and bring awareness to their internal landscape, and which support healthy communication.

    • Novelty Seeking: Increased drive for rewards and increased inner motivation to seek new experiences and feel life more fully

    Upside: Being open to change and exploring new ways of doing things that lead to a sense of adventure

    Downside: Sensation seeking and taking risks without considering consequences can lead to dangerous behavior

    • Social Engagement: Enhanced peer connectedness and new friendships are explored

    Upside: The drive for social connection leads to creation of supportive relationships that can support and enrich teens their whole life

    Downside: Adolescents might isolate themselves from other adults and only surround themselves with other teens, which can lead to increased risky behavior

    • Increased Emotional Intensity: Emotional sensitivity increases, allowing teens to feel life experiences more intensely

    Upside: Emotional intensity can fill teens with energy and a sense of vitality for being alive

    Downside: Emotional intensity can fill teens with energy and a sense of vitality for being alive. Emotions can rule the day, leading to moodiness and, sometimes unhelpful, reactivity

    • Creative Exploration: Expanded sense of being leads to conceptual thinking that question status quo and approaches problems with out-of-the-box solutions

    Upside: Sense of wonder, creativity, and curiosity can be nurtured; new solutions and strategies for a fuller life are explored

    Downside: New explorations can lead to crisis of identity, susceptibility to peer pressure, and lack of direction or purpose


    Taking these findings into account highlights why mindfulness interventions are critical at this age.   

    There is promising, if nascent evidence, that mindfulness can support adolescent wellbeing by supporting development of their prefrontal cortex (where empathy, thinking of consequences, and other executive function skills live), by enhancing their ability to focus, and helping them name and regulate their emotions. In addition, studies of adults participating in mindfulness interventions like Mindfulness Based Stressed Reduction “suggest that participation in MBSR is associated with changes in gray matter concentration in brain regions involved in learning and memory processes, emotion regulation, self-referential processing, and perspective taking.” These research studies, coupled with my experience teaching adolescent, makes it easy to argue for introducing mindfulness interventions to adolescents.   

    Introducing mindfulness to teens can be especially rewarding and challenging. Working with adolescents can bring to the surface the unresolved feelings and painful experiences we faced as adolescent. To be effective with this age group, we must reflect and turn to our own practice. We also have to make sure that when we offer mindfulness to adolescents it is relevant and engaging otherwise we won’t be able to truly support them. 

    The following reminders are helpful when working with teens. 
    Some of these apply to all age groups, but they hold special importance when working with adolescents.
    Adolescence spans from the ages of 12 to 24. This is one of the most confusing times of our lives, even when things are going well.

    • Remember what your adolescence was like, and have compassion!
    • Students’ feelings should be validated always, but especially keep this in mind now, because many adults are dismissive of the strong emotions of teens.
    • Practices, conversations, and activities should be relevant tothe students’ lives.
    • Learning should be student centered when possible, and students should be given opportunities to share and interact with one another.
    • Students tend to be sensitive about the way they are perceived by others, but they might not fully understand how they perceive themselves. 
    • Support healthy identity formation by creating a culture of acceptance of individual difference and respect for personal boundaries.
    • Avoid stereotypical language, and recognize your own assumptions and biases.​

    This is just the beginning of a conversation.  Little Flower Yoga has activities specifically designed for this age group.  Check out our Teen Deck as well as our Teen Webinar on Wed, Dec 5 at 7:30 PM, EST, which goes into more details about creating engaging experience when working with adolescents.   

    If this is a topic of interest we hope you’ll find these resources helpful.


    ABOUT ARGOS GONZALEZ:
    Argos Gonzalez is a teacher, lecturer, and mindfulness and yoga instructor.  He has 13 years of experience teaching high school in the Bronx and teaches pre-service and in-service teachers at Hunter College School of Education in NY.  Argos is certified through both Mindful Schools and Little Flower Yoga (LFY), and currently serves as the director of professional development for The School Yoga Project, a program of LFY.

    For more information about Little Flower Yoga and The School Yoga Project, visit www.littlefloweryoga.com. Contact Argos by email at argos@littlefloweryoga.com.  

    We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites. If you are interested in purchasing any of the resources mentioned above, you can help support free programs like Mindful Mondays by navigating to them through the included links. Thank you for your support!

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  • Mindful Mondays: How Can Mindfulness Support Rest?


    In order to get true rest, we must help both our body and mind relax and release tension.


    Mindfulness can support this kind of rest in a number of ways. One of the ways it does this is by helping us bring kind and curious awareness to our mind and body, and by encouraging us to be compassionate toward our self. When we look at our self with compassion, we begin to notice all the wonderful and miraculous ways our body and mind support us. We’ll also see that our body and mind are probably in need of more rest, and this awareness can move us to care for our self. 

     

    Our days are filled with so much to do that we often find ourselves too busy to rest or take a break. In fact, there are some who see business as a status symbol to be proud of. Others see it as the “disease of being ‘busy’ (and let’s call it what it is: the dis-ease of being busy, when we are never at ease). These attitudes are spiritually destructive to our health and well-being. They sap our ability to be fully present with those we love the most in our families, and they keep us from forming the kind of community that we all so desperately crave.” One reason we’re all so busy is that, for many of us, leisure time and work time are becoming the same thing. An Atlantic article describing the way many spend leisure time explains: “Thanks to smartphones and computers, leisure activity is leaking into work, and work, too, is leaking into leisure.” In other words, when we’re at work we likely check our social media accounts, and when we’re at home we probably check our work e-mail. 

     

    Another way to look at this is to consider whether the breaks we take actually give us a restful moment. Checking social media, or getting an update on a work project, or filling up our mind with any amount of busyness and worry—such as thinking about our to-do lists—doesn’t help us rest. Multitasking is a bad habit when we’re working, let alone when trying to rest. During breaks, what our mind could really use is rest or stillness.


    And that’s why it’s important to bring awareness to our mind and body, so we can then implement strategies that support true rest and relaxation.


    Oftentimes we simply distract our self (or numb our self) from stress, or inject another type of busyness into our life. For example, getting lost in a book or in a favorite TV show can be a rewarding way to spend leisure time, but it might not be helping us find lasting peace of mind. If escaping, rather than engaging, our stressors is the only way we cope with them, we won’t get meaningful rest—or worse, we add more worry and stress to our life.

     

    When we bring our full awareness to what our body and mind are feeling, with care and attention, we can see what troubles us. We can also notice what helps to restore and heal us. When we can see where we hold tension in our body, we are better equipped to make good choices: We might opt to take a nap or a warm bath, get a message or acupuncture, take a restorative yoga class, practice tai chi or qigong, or find other ways that aid our body in releasing stress and tension. 

     

    We must also take care of our mind, because if our mind is preoccupied or filled with stress we may not fully relax. In other words, if you are getting a very soothing massage but your mind is frantic with a million thoughts, you’lll still feel lots of tension in the body due to stress. Finding ways to help our mind rest takes practice. Mindfulness activities can help us slow down the pace of our thoughts and gain greater perspective, which ultimately will help manage our stress and the way our body and mind respond to stress.

    For more information on how to be better at stress, check out these resources from The New York Times.


    This article is part of our Mindful Mondays initiative. Receive weekly emails with instructions for the practices of the week, links to guided practices, and suggestions for implementation by registering. The program is free for all. Sign up now to access this week's recorded practices for you and your students!


    ABOUT ARGOS GONZÁLEZ:

    Argos Gonzalez is a teacher, lecturer, and mindfulness and yoga instructor.  He has 13 years of experience teaching high school in the Bronx and teaches pre-service and in-service teachers at Hunter College School of Education in NY.  Argos is certified through both Mindful Schools and Little Flower Yoga (LFY), and currently serves as the director of professional development for The School Yoga Project, a program of LFY. For more information about Little Flower Yoga and The School Yoga Project, visit www.littlefloweryoga.com. Contact Argos by email at argos@littlefloweryoga.com

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